Happy [cheery, merry, joyful, jocular, gleeful] birthday, Peter

bluebird of bitterness

A little bibliophile humor today in honor of the birthday of Peter Mark Roget (1779-1869), author of Roget’s Thesaurus of English Words and Phrases Classified and Arranged so as to Facilitate the Expression of Ideas and Assist in Literary Composition.

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Storms Come

From the hurricane prone Texas Gulf Coast

Last night thunder
in the distance
said: I will come.
Quiet at first,
then roared:
HERE!

But I don’t remember its name.
There wasn’t enough damage.

Storms come
from the distance
all the time,
say: expect rain
and deliver,
as promised.

But we don’t remember names
without enough damage.

Then storms come
turn your around
expose your insides
say: I have come.
Rarely quiet
always unexpected:
HERE!

And we remember. Name them.
Recount the damage. Again.

POEM ©2019, Jen Payne. On the 13th anniversary. IMAGE: Oak fractured by a lightning, Maxim Vorobiev.

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SATURDAY MORNINGS FOR KIDS ON SATURDAY NIGHT

powerfulwomenreaders

Because My Better Half and I were treating one of  my last semester’s Advanced Writing Students to a breakfast at Denny’s and had to be in Houston at 8:00 a.m. to congratulate her on winning a $5.000 scholarship, I didn’t post Saturday Morning for Kids first thing early Saturday morning as usual.(The TV cartoons for kids which inspired this meme/post started at 6:00 a.m. on Saturday mornings.) Instead, I had such a busy, full day that I am just  posting at 8:00 p.m.

Today’s selection is the proposed first book in a series originated by Maureen George and illustrated by Anna DeVito. I do not know if this first book, published in 1992, actually became a series, but the first book, “The Neighbor From Outer Space” definitely had a cliffhanger ending that promised another book.

Katie Taffy, her two best girlfriends, and one of the girlfriend’s pesky little brothers make…

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FRIDAY FIRSTLINERS

powerfulwomenreaders

I have been reading up a storm for the past three days; maybe that’s why we’ve had rain, rain and are rain lately on the Texas Gulf Coast. A book I started Thursday evening was Nutshell by Ian McEwan, author of Atonement, one of my all-time favorite books and films. The novel is the story of Hamlet, in modern times, told from the point of view of a fetus still in his mother’s womb. Here is the opening:

“So here I am, upside down in a woman. Arms patiently crossed, waiting, waiting and wondering who I’m in, what I’m in for.”

Yes, it’s a fascinating concept, and the writing style is unique as well. I am really looking forward to reading more as the day progresses. Happy Reading!

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Smorgasbord Laughter Lines – Some new material – The Cornier the better!

Smorgasbord Blog Magazine

I have not been wasting my festive break. I needed some new material and searched my files going back 20 years to find some jokes that have not graced these pages so far…..along with a few visual funnies.

Mother-in-laws

A young married couple were having their first argument and it was a humdinger. ‘I wish I had listened to my mother and never married you’, she sobbed.

‘Do you mean to tell me,’ said her husband furiously, ‘that you mother tried to stop you marrying me?’

‘Yes she did,’ spluttered the wife.

‘Heavens above!’ the husband exclaimed. ‘How I have wronged that woman!’

Lost in Translation.

An American was complaining to an Englishman in a West End Hotel, that he found many English terms confusing.

‘You say “Rubbish” and we say “garbage”, he explained. ‘We say “trunk” and you say “boot” and we say “apartment” and you say “flat”. And…

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