SATURDAY MORNINGS FOR KIDS, DEWEY’S EDITION

powerfulwomenreaders

Just as Saturday mornings were a time for kids’ cartoons in the 50s and 60s, PWR features books recommended for kids on Saturday Mornings. This Saturday morning happens to also be Dewey’s 24 Hour Readathon.

3:30 p.m. Check in

Today’s recommendation for kids is a special anthology of poems, all addressed to Planet Earth. This fine book is a Cybils nominee.

Hello Earth! is a 2021 Contender.

Poems from kids to Planet Earth, asking questions is a lovely book of poetry which appeals to kids of all ages and the parents and grandparents who may read it to them.

Interesting facts about the formation and qualities of our planet are included as answers to the queries of children who live there. Questions about gravity, orbit, natural resources all come together in an organized, fluid collection of poems. One simply leads into another, ending with a message encouraging good stewardship of…

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#ThorsDaySmile – #amlaughing – #humor

The Write Stuff

Every other ThorsDay is #ThorsDaySmile time, so here are a few Signs
of the Times to make you laugh. Hope some of them are new to you!
Enjoy!
😄

And here’s a cat, because, hello?  CAT!

And last, another one of THESE, because … well, no real reason,
except that I’ve loved every caption I’ve seen added to these pics!Now on that note, I am outta here!
Keep smiling, folks!

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SATURDAY MORNINGS FOR KIDS

powerfulwomenreaders

Teens read for many reasons: escape, connectedness, self-growth, and entertainment.

Today’s Saturday morning recommendation is a Cybils nominee I finished last night.

I am serving as a first round panelist in poetry for middle grades and YA. I get to read all the nominated books, both anthologies and novels in verse.

What if everyone is evacuated because of an “impending threat,” and you are left behind?

This novel in verse is set in a strange situation. The protagonist finds herself left behind after an equally strange evacuation. Dealing with many questions and what ifs, she spends over three years totally alone, learning survival skills as she goes. Her father thinks she is with her mother, and vice versa, and three quarters through the story, she realizes that her parents aren’t coming back for her–the reverse of the thought that kept her going.

Facing martialist looters, wild dogs, and other scary…

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