First Line Fridays

My first line for today’s post is from Aiden J. Reid’s Raising Lazarus, published in 2018. The first book I read by him was Pathfinder, his debut novel. Because it was so good, I read Sigil next, and intend to read more as they come out. It begins with a mysterious man who believes he was raised from the dead by a wandering prophet two thousand years ago. Here are the first few lines:

“His eyes opened to the ceiling, a ventilator fan above wobbling on its base like a fat airplane propeller.  Despite the thick air in the room, the blunt blades carved through and a gentle breeze blew on his face; folds of chopped air like cold butter cooling his forehead. There was a dark stain on the face of the fan. His eyes narrowed on the patch, tracing its outer edge, trying to shape it into a figure that he might recognize.”

 

BREAKFAST WITH BUDDAH byRoland Merullo: A Review

powerfulwomenreaders

This 2007 novel was an easy way to consider Eastern Religions, learn about the culture of America and Asia, and enjoy a darned good read, all at the same time. I had heard about this book from students, bloggers, and book club friends, but I’d never gotten around to reading it. When I saw it displayed (in large print) at my local library, I pounced on it and took it home, beginning to read that night. I assumed it would be a fast read, but some of the philosophical ideas caused me to digest it slowly, putting it aside fairly frequently to muse over some idea or concept.

The plot is fairly simple, but definitely original. Otto Ringling,  middle-aged father, editor by occupation, makes a car trip from New York City where he lives and works to the North Dakota farmhouse in which he was raised. His “flaky/hippie” sister was…

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WWW Wednesday

powerfulwomenreaders

This meme was originated by MizB at A Daily Rhythm, and I discovered it on my friend, Sam’s blog Taking on a World of Words. The meme seems to be spreading, and it is a quick way to give your readers an update on your reading each Wednesday.

Three questions: What are you currently reading? What have you finished lately? and What do you hope/intend to read next? If you have a blog, leave your URL in the respond section; if not, then write the answers to the three questions in that same box.

Here are mine for Wednesday, October 17, 2018:

I am currently reading several books, but the one I have to keep stopping and writing wonderful words in my quote notebook is Spurgeon’s Sermons, Vol. 2.  One of my Advanced Writing students loaned me this book, and although I will return it to her soon, I…

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MY UNEXPECTED PASSION by Sean Dickey: Part I

Literacy and Me

Sean Dicky is perhaps the strongest, most consistent writer in this semester’s Advanced Writing class. I have asked him to guest post on my blog, and his essay is as follows:

“I have worked in retail for nearly a decade now. I began when I was twenty, hired to a part time job at a major retailer.  In the years I have worked for the company, I have learned skills I never thought I would. As unlikely as it may seem, I even discovered what would become the inspiration for my future career.

I like to think of myself as a logical and sensible person.  If I find something I do not understand, I ask questions until I find an answer I consider comprehensible. This practice has not endeared me to many of my managers over the years. With my constant questioning of both manager instructions and corporate policies, it…

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MY UNEXPECTED PASSION by Sean Dickey: Part II

Literacy and Me

Sean is in my Advanced Writing class this semester. This is the continuation of his essay on finding his passion, his major, and his future career. Part I precedes this; just scroll down and read it first.

“…Three years into this [retail] company, I decided I could not make a career out of retail and returned to college. Eventually I ended up in the psychology program.  What could be more intriguing for me than a field involved in understanding people and their motivations? Every individual has their own psyche, molded and influenced by a lifetime of experiences. Even though I had no idea of what I would do with the degree, I began taking courses. Finally in 2017, I signed up for the undergraduate course for Industrial-Organizational Psychology. The professor introduced us to a variety of topics, including things like selection, motivation, leadership, and training. It was the psychology of…

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