A Guide to Hanging Out With Cloth Ears.

Just Another Blog From a Woman

It’s Deaf Awareness Week, so as yours truly has cloth ears, I thought I’d do my bit to help with that awareness. I lost my hearing after having a baby and have to rely on hearing aids to hear. There’s more on that in this post here. However, even with hearing aids it’s a day to day struggle trying to hear sounds and conversations. What would help people like me, is if people were aware of the ways that would help us with our hearing issues (and in turn help you).

deaf culture huh

So, here’s my tips for when you’re with a deaf person:
– ensure you’ve got your deaf friend’s attention before talking to them
– make sure you’re talking in their direction and don’t turn away in the middle of talking to them either. If you suddenly need to grab something that’s in a different direction to your friend-…

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TAGGED: I’M IT AGAIN

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My blogging friend, James Cudney at This is My Truth Now has started a tag/game where he has posed several questions about one’s reading, looking back over what one has read since January of this year. I am responding to some/most of the prompts he has given.

  1. The best book you have read so far in 2017–That would have to be The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas.  It not only made me think; it changed my thinking.
  2. Your favorite sequel this year–Many Waters by Madeline L’Engle a YA novel by children’s author I discovered while teaching sixth graders.
  3. A new release that you haven’t read but really want to–Just about every book reviewed in the Sunday editions of The Houston Chronicle.
  4. Your Biggest Disappointment– The Education of Dixie Dupree.  I’m not sure if I can come up with a reason why.
  5. The Biggest Surprise of the Year–Before We Visit…

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BEFORE WE VISIT THE GODDESS by Chitra Banerjee Divakaruni: A REVIEW

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This 2016 publication particularly appealed to me because I had read Divakaruni’s One Amazing Thing and because I knew she was a professor of Creative Writing at The University of Houston, not only my alma mater, but also one of the five campuses in the system that employs me. She has written for The New Yorker, The Atlantic, and The New York Times, so I was aware of her writing prowess going in to this novel. It deals with four generations of women and the ins and outs of mother daughter relationships.

The setting ranges from Bengal, India to Houston, Texas, another selling point for me. Basically it is the story of Sabritri, daughter of the village sweets maker, Durga; Sabritri’s daughter Bella; and her daughter Tara. The novel explores many different forms and kinds of love, love that reaches across generations. All of the women are strong female…

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Wednesday’s Words: On Shel Silverstein and Other Things

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Continuing with the idea of teaching poetry to elementary age kids, one sure fire poet is Shel Silverstein, a favorite of kids and adults alike.  With Silverstein, one does not have to wait for an occasion to integrate poetry into daily activities, whether in the classroom or at home (Listen up Grandparents!). Looking at trash from the classroom or from the home, Silverstein’s “Sarah Cynthia Sylvia Stout Would Not Take the Garbage Out” is the perfect poetry “happening.” Reading aloud the sound-filled poem (“She’d scour the pots and scrape the pans”) introduces what Sarah will and will not do.  Taking the garbage out is where she draws the line.  Vivid, but gross images follow:

“And so it piled up to the ceilings:

Coffee grounds, potato peelings,

Brown bananas, rotten peas,

Chunks of sour cottage cheese…

…With bacon rinds and chicken bones,

Drippy ends of ice cream cones,

Prune pits, peach…

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A Good Book for a Psychology Textbook, Beyond Human Nature: How Culture and Experience Shape the Human Mind: A Review

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While tidying up and rearranging furniture in all the rooms in anticipation of out-of-state company in June, I came across a yellow legal pad which had fallen behind the dresser.  On it were the notes for a review of Jesse J. Prinz’s book which deals with the human mind.  Checking back over Sunday (Evening) Posts, I never reported finishing the book nor posted its review, so here it is.

This 2012 publication by Jesse J. Prinz would make an excellent psychology textbook, as it deals with a review of the nature vs nature debate while focusing on what is uniquely human and what is universally human as opposed to the animal kingdom. Studies and case studies from both kingdoms are given as well as the author’s “take” on the role of biology on the human mind and on human behaviors. The author takes issue with the notion that “genetics explains…

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TEACHING POETRY IN ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

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When we studied homonyms, I found a delightful book, Your Aunt is a Witch, which presents homonym pairs in easy to remember rhymes.  The cover alone catches the eye of the reluctant reader. I converted the rhymes into a painless but practical worksheet series for the students to illustrate.  Here is one of the rhymes converted into worksheet style:

Little Prince Randolph is ( heir  air ) to the throne,

And some day he will be king.

He simply adores to fly through the ( heir   air )

On his solid gold, diamond-trimmed swing!

After the children pick the correct word, there is space to illustrate the rhyme.

When we discussed literal vs figurative language, I found The King Who Reigned a humorous combination of figurative images illustrated by literal drawings which also dealt with confusing homonyms. The children enjoyed making their own funny illustrations of “She’s all ears,”…

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