SATURDAY MORNINGS FOR KIDS (On Sunday, 1/29/23)

powerfulwomenreaders

I’m not quite through, but reading One Crazy Summer, a Newberry Honor Book, winner of the Scott O’Dell Award for Historical Fiction, the Corretta Scott King Award, and a National Book Award Finalist, has been such a positive experience that I’ve ordered the other two books in the “Gaither Sisters Series” by Rita Williams-Garcia.

The Gaither Sisters, travel to Oakland, California, on their first airplane trip, by themselves, to meet the mother who abandoned them to be raised by their father and “Big Ma.” It is a tumultuous time for Oakland, and the girls find their very sophisticated mother involved with the Black Panthers and all the riots and terror in Oakland that summer.

I am only on page eighty, but I have come to empathize with and care about all three girls, from Delphine, the oldest, to Vonetta and Fern, her younger siblings. Cecile, their mother, is “something else,”…

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A WORD TO MY STUDENTS

This semester, I will be teaching freshmen for the first time since 2017. My Advanced Writing students have been giving me dire warnings about what I am in for. This cartoon posted by the Bluebird of Bitterness in a series on “Board of Education” gives good advice to this semester’s students:

Students, I actually do explain things in class! Please give me your undivided attention for the hour we are together. Be patient with me when I run over; I’m used to a three hour class. I promise to do my best to end on time.

I am looking forward to this semester!

Mrs. Longest

CHRISTMAS EVE REVIEW of THE MESSY LIVES OF BOOK PEOPLE by Phaedra Patrick

powerfulwomenreaders

This brand new (published 2022) novel about bookish people doing bookish things is the best novel I’ve read in a good while. It comes in third or fourth of the best book I’ve read overall in 2022.

Olivia, “Liv” Green, cleaner, aspiring writer, avid reader of Essie Starling’s books, takes a job for Essie herself, cleaning her apartment. Essie’s books feature Georgia Ray, whom Liv would love to model herself after, but she doesn’t have the guts. As Liv develops as an author, she also develops as a person, growing more like Georgia Ray with each daring move.

Caught up in an impossible plot, Liv finds herself lying to her preoccupied husband, her two grown sons, and pulls it all off nicely. Frequent references to Essie’s books about Georgia’s life occur, as do references to Liv’s reading life of real, current authors, many of whom I’ve read and admired. Before…

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